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-span, watson -- highlights from the senate for debate at 7:00 eastern on "america and the courts." coming this fall, into the home to america's highest court, the supreme court. >> president obama used his weekly online address to refute critics of pending health-care legislation. the republican addresses given this week by bob mcdonnell, the candidate for virginia governor. he talks about the economy, job creation, and the federal energy bill. >> on friday we received better news than we expected about the state of our economy. we learned that we lost 247 nelson jobs in july, some 200,000 fewer jobs than we lost in june, and far fewer than the nearly 700,000 a month we were losing at the beginning of the year. of course, this is little comfort to anyone who saw their jobs disappear in july, and to the millions of americans who are looking for work. i will not rest until anyone who is looking for work can find a job. still, this month's job numbers are a sign that we have begun to put the brakes on this recession and that the worst may be behind us, but we must do more than rescue our eco
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
. very happy to see all of you here. today's hearing will focus on insuring that america leads the clean energy transformation as we address the threat posed by climate change. i want to welcome our witnesses who will share their insights and expertise on this critical subject. we are facing two historic challenges in america today, a deep economic recession and the threat of unchecked global warming. during this hearing we'll examine the ways in which federal initiatives are already addressing both of these challenges. and about additional steps we can take to provide incentives for clean energy development to transform the american economy. this country can and should be a leader of the clean energy revolution. clean energy and climate legislation provides the certainty that companies need and the signal businesses are looking for to mobilize capital and harness the greatest source of power we have in this great country, american ingenuity. clean energy legislation is jobs legislation by creating powerful incentives for clean energy it will create millions of new jobs in america, it'll
managed state in america? did you know that under democratic leadership, seven times, we have been named the best they to do business in america ended june known that we have even been named by education week as the state were a child is most likely to have a successful life? [applause] that is what democratic leadership means. we find solutions to everyday issues that everyday people care about. the want to keep that going? [applause] i want to keep it going because i may not be governor in january but i will still be a virginian. what i know now is that we are in some tough times. this has been the most challenging economy that virginia or the nation has faced since the 1930's. i have had to make some painful decisions as governor but i made the decisions i needed to make to keep virginia moving in the right direction. when you're a governor in tough times, you come to appreciate character of people who can make tough decisions and do the right things to put virginia first and i am here to tell you that i will not lose one second of sleep and in fact i will sleep with a big smile on my
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
of america. and during the conversation comparing the canadian and the u.s. system and part of the interview includes a look at the cultural differences between our two countries. here's an excerpt of next week's q and a. >> i'm pretty tough on canada because they keep you waiting so long. and i was talking to minister in canada and i said you keep people waiting. how can you call this good health care? you have to wait months to see a speshtist. and his answer was, look, canadians don't mind waiting so much as long as the rich canadian and the poor canadian have to wait about the same amount of time. and that is their national culture. and we don't have that ethic. it's a standard in america that rich people are going to get better health care than poor people. no other country lets that happen. host: your response to the comments of the author. guest: well, i think i have to agree that this is a different attitude that we have and that you don't have here in the states. for us, it doesn't matter if you have money or you don't have money for health care, you will be offered the same kind of
says president obama is trying to change america, but maybe not the change you bargained for. outspoken conservative actor jon voight will be here to tell us why he's become so involved and he'll give us his take on health care reform. and they're one of the top christian music bands in the world, but recording platinum albums and selling out concerts not their only job. they're also youth counselors who try to keep teenagers on the right path. grammy award winning casting crowns purchase one of their biggest hits here on the show tonight. well, this weekend, funeral services were held for senator ted kennedy and with his burial, the end of a long and storied senate career. though there were many controversy over the issues in his personnel life, he was true to his personnal political convictions, he didn't try to reinvent himself with each owe lex or poll and proudly proclaimed himself a liberal when most ran from the label. i respect people who are honest in their own political leanings far more than those who change with the season. no one can accuse ted kennedy of campaigning differ
natural to start with jazz, america's indigenous art form. >> indeed, jazz is considered by many to be america's greatest artistic gift to the world. the understanding and appreciation of jazz is integral to understanding and appreciating american history and culture. >> country and classical music will also be featured in future sessions of the white house music series. >>> in case you missed it, a fourth season of "america's got talent" is under way. shows like this have brought us names including susan boyle and little caitlin mayer. the latest is the youngest and quite possibly the most precocious reality tv star we've ever seen. eun yang caught up with caitlin a year after her voice got into the competition's final rounds. >> hi. how are you going? >> i'm fine. how are you doing? >> i'm well. thank you for asking. >> she stole america's hearts with her sweet face, sparkling personality -- ♪ i think to myself what a wonderful world ♪ >> -- and her angelic voice. ♪ friends shaking hands saying how do you do they're really saying i love you ♪ >> in last season's "americ
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
this year let us offer new hope, new hope to an america uncertain about the present, but unsurpassed in its potential for the future. to all those who are idle in the cities and industries of america let us provide new hope for the dignity of useful work. democrats have always believed that a basic civil right of all americans is their right to earn their own way. the party of the people must always be the party of full employment. to all those who doubt the future of our economy, let us provide new hope for the reindustrialization of america. and let our vision reach beyond the next election or the next year to a new generation of prosperity. if we could rebuild germany and japan after world war ii, then surely we can reindustrialize our own nation and revive our inner cities in the 1980s. to all those who work hard for a living wage let us provide new hope that the price of their employment shall not be an unsafe workplace and a death at an earlier age. to all those who inhabit our land from california to the new york island, from the redwood forest to the gulfstream waters, let us provid
america's coastline? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning to you again this morning. i'm diane sawyer in times square. robin is on assignment on this thursday, august 27th. and chris cuomo is anchoring our coverage from hyannisport, massachusetts. chris, good morning. any signs the family is stirring this morning? >> good morning, diane. i don't think i've ever been able to say this before, but the kennedy compound is quiet. and talking to family members, from youngest to oldest yesterday, they all remember teddy the same way. he was there for them always. and now, they are make sure they are there for him. the family is literally, taking shifts, holding vigil, over teddy's body, making sure the man who they love is never alone. even in the final moments, he showed his strength. >> there was a certain peace there that was absolutely beautiful. >> reporter: now, loved ones are gathering at the family compound to mourn and celebrate. >> that's what we're going to do in the next few days. celebrate his life, a wonderful life. >> reporter: a family who played in the surf wh
outs hopes of a little bit, put a bank of america intraday here because the financials are starting to move just in the last 15 or 20 minutes. you see that? the volume has picked up here too. a number of the other banks. i'm just putting up bank of america as an example. what's going on? well, there isn't any news out there. remember, though, we are going to get some delinquency data next week on credit card delinquencies. i've heard some hopes out there that maybe some of the trust data as it's called might show trends that are a little bit better than expected. again, there might be hope for a last hour rally. tradertalk.cnbc.com. let's go to scott standing by at the nasdaq. >> bob, thanks. we're lower for the week. now we're lower for the month of august. today we're down by 1 3/4%. that translates to a loss of some 34 points. a broad-based sell-off throughout not only technology but elsewhere. i'll take you through that in just a second. chips, for example, they've been weak throughout the day. one of the weakest spots on the nasdaq today. philadelphia semiconductor index, the s
that it did to america's image in the world is something we're still on the way to repairing. >> although snort mccain opposes so-called enhanced interrogations, he says opening this investigation is a serious mistake because it could harm the cia's morale and effectiveness. democratic senator diane feinstein says she's horrified what she's read about the interrogation, she thinks the attorney general should have let the senate intelligence committee should have continued its own review before taking any acti action. >> thank you. brand new details tonight on two stunning crimes. in georgia, seven people found dead inside their home. cops have made an arrest, but the case is far from closed. and virginia tech students grieving as cops investigate the deaths of two teenagers. those stories after the break. if you're taking 8 extra-strength tylenol... a day on the days that you have arthritis pain, you could end up taking 4 times the number... of pills compared to aleve. choose aleve and you could start taking fewer pills. just 2 aleve have the strength... to relieve arthritis pain all day.
this morning." >>> good morning, america. and this morning, breaking news. eunice kennedy shriver, the pioneer behind special olympics and the sister of john f. kennedy has died. we take a look bag at ore life and her legacy. >>> president obama braces for protests at his town hall meeting on health care today. can he cal the explosive war of words? >>> hillary clinton lashes out, after a question strikes a nerve. >> wait. you want me to tell you what my husband thinks? my husband is not the secretary of state. i am. >> is the former president stealing his wife's thunder? >>> and coming to a theater near you, michael jackson, the movie. a front-row seat to his final performance. could it be his biggest show performance. could it be his biggest show yet? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, everyone. alongside chris cuomo, i'm robin roberts. diane sawyer is off on this tuesday, august 11th. we're mourning the passing of eunice kennedy shriver. she was 88 years old. >> obviously, a very long life and legacy. she had been dealing with health ailments in these final ye
commitment come up. >> this is not the america i knew. i don't want it going his way. this administration is nuts. enough is enough. >> democrats want to win virginia to show that obama and the agenda is still popular. republicans want to win virginia in order to show they are on the rebound and on the comeback trail. >> the republican leading deeds. we will see whether the president's appearance tonight changes the poll numbers. what we know is president obama's approval rating in virginia is on the decline according to one poll by public policy polling. it comes as mr. obama is set to campaign today with deeds. with me now is democratic commentator vick hamber and we have reynard jackson with us also. the numbers are mr. obama's popularity is only at 42% in the commonwealth. this is a state he carried in 2008. so what is happening, vick. >> people are coming home to their normal party. it is six months later. we have economic problems. all the problems haven't been solved in the six months he's been president so i think it is a natural. if you look at the polling numbers where mr. bush
things up. bank of america, $33 million to settle charges that they made false or misleading statements regarding bonuses paid to merrill lynch executives. and mary thompson's going to give you all the details on that in just a moment. on the cyclicals and the weak dollar, most of the major names are the highest levels since september or october of last year. all the big names were up 2%, 3%, 4%, even 6% or 7% here. auto storksz ford's at a new high. toyota's at the highest level since september.. the big car dealers like sonic automotive were up. again, the companies that have replacement parts are the ones that were down here today. finally, the defensive names looking very good here. excuse me. are the big laggards here as the people out there who are actively in the market want cyclicals, not defensive.e. there's the s&p 500 over 1,000 there for the first time since november. and as i said, 66 was the march 9th low. exactly 50% above that. melissa, back to you. >> yeah, ominous, but we don't mind now. thanks so much, bob pisani. a management shake-up and an s.e.c. settlement for ban
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
would say donations. >> advertising for products. >> public money, i am short. >> by taxes? >> america's cable companies created c-span is a public service, a private business initiative -- note government mandate, no government money. >> the department has begun sending out the first tuition payments to universities but dissipating indeed post 9/11 g.i. bill -- participating in the post 9/11 g.i. bill program. more on that from jim webb, a co-sponsor the bill. we'll also hear from eric shinseki and president obama. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is an honored have you with us today and is an honor for us to host this important celebration. earlier this year, george mason was privileged to be one of the many colleges and universities across the nations to commit itself to the yellow ribbon enhancement program. a provision of the post 9/11 g.i. bill of 2008, this initiative is designed to extend higher education funding for servicemen and women who served after the september 11, 2001 attacks. i know that members of that day still remain in all of our hearts. shock, horror, a tragedy. f
, america. >>ood morning. it is saturday, august 8th and we're going to keep running thatusic there? >> disco. >> and good news. good news for job hunters out there. latest unemployment numbers went down slightly for the first time fifillstarti to hire.cocoulbe a but flipside is that 15 million americans are still looking for work. what if theyey joined a club, le a book club, but for seers. >>> also this morning, the yo ww rkseom who w killed seven people and herself driving the wrong way. had dedevice the legal limit of alcohol and marijuana in her blood. but her husband swears he's never seen her drunk ever. either he's lying, the coroner's wrong, or she had a secret addiction. how is sanssible?le? dul.also, what's next for paula she says sheea's lngamvi "erican idol." is it a gooderove to quit the most populgo sarw on television? look at some other stars. they made risky decisions. will she soar like a clooney? or fade like a dunkleman? that's coming up. >>> first this morning, the fight is on. testing for the swine flu vaccine began late friday, in seattle. as health officials
: and welcome to a very special edition of "hannity's america." -- of "hannity." hello, san diego. the site of our freedom concert and we have a big show in store. colonel oliver north will be here. former ms. california, carrie prejean, will be joined by the great one mark levine and our great american panel. and democrats are continuing their efforts to attack average americans who are speaking pout at town halls all across this country -- speak being out at town halls all across this country. they have been called angry mobs and dismissed as republican operatives. why are the democrats afraid of speech and can the strategy work? i'm joined by -- i call him the great one -- 12 weeks number one on "the new york times" best seller list, 17 weeks overall, liberty and tyranny, a conservative manifesto. great one, the great one. by the way, do you have a mob name? >> a mob name? i'm the shark. sean: you're the shark. he's the shark. are you all mobsters here? an angry mob. >> wait a minute. how many of you are insurance executives? raise your hand? how many of you here are -- what, car executi
it as part of cspan's america and the courts saturday at 7:00, eastern. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago this weekend, half a million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder will take us behind the scenes. that will be at 9:00 p.m., eastern, on both tv. >> how is cspan funded? >> donations? >> federal funds, grant funds? >> maybe contributions. >> austin, i don't know. >> i would say from commercials. >> advertising? >> something from the government? >> 30 years ago, america pause cable companies created cspan as a public service. it is a private business initiative with no government mandate, no government money. >> while we wait for live coverage of the netroots convention in less than one hour, conversation with one of the conservative bloggers meeting in pittsburgh this weekend from this morning's " washington journal per-ql." host: tell us what you are representing. guest: i am here to talk about conservative activism on line and become larger participants. people across the country can act with one voice. host: we have been checking with rep
children, we have exclusive >>> good morning, america. breaking news. a continental airlines jet making an emergency landing in miami after turbulence, severe turbulence injures more than two dozen people. what was it like on board? we have a live report. >>> and capture. three american students detained in iran after crossing the border during a hike. their last message, we're surrounded. >>> did michael jackson have a fourth child, exclusive video of the jackson family vacation. who is this young man always at jackson's side? >>> the newest poster person for diet and weight loss. rush limbaugh loses 90 pounds in 5 months. a new diet trend. could it work for you? >>> and the boom that went bust. we show you how not to blow up a >>> and the boom that went bust. we show you how not to blow up a building. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. welcome to this new week. i'm diane sawyer with robin roberts on monday, august 3rd, 2009. what could it have been like aboard that plane with that turbulence? still getting news in. >> we know it was a continental flig
. uncompensated care in america cost $43 billion. you and i pay that tax. now, -- i want to address the 47 million who do not have health care coverage, to bring them into the system and that can help lower cost by having a bigger risk pools. the second thing i want to do is having meaningful cost of health care reform. let's start with medicare. i want to close the doughnut hole on prescription drugs. i want to make sure all of our seniors have access to the medications they need and that no one in america over 55 or 65 casta make this terrible decision, to lead by a meal or the prescription drugs that i need? yew instead both the there are some specialized prescription drugs that cost a lot of money. i want to make sure a catastrophic illness does not bankrupt families in america. in our district alone, the 11th congressional district, last year, 1430 families filed for bankruptcy because of health care costs. any family in america, young or old, could be one accident or one illness away from catastrophic health care costs. capping health-care -- catastrophic costs so that the family is forced i
leading the charge -- the president of the autism society of america. they have been listening to families about these issues and trying to come up with recommendations. i am sure that group would love to have an audience and get some ideas that they have been grappling with. >> you just wrote about standards. someone mentioned that you get all kinds of misinformation. you have been on this telehealth for three years now. when you mention standards, is that what you're talking about? >> absolutely. when we start our treatment program, it is a comprehensive treatment program. unfortunately, families can pop up in the internet search and tiepin -- type in telehealth treatment. i do not see how it is possible to form a true therapeutic bond and go ahead and treat the child. is very disconcerting. you can quarry pretty much anything with autism and related disorders. whether it is some way to repair your car, somebody who can paint your house, it is so sporadic. parents do not have a consistent place to ensure that they're going to receive quality care. i am encouraged that you have folks meet
that today is the day of reckoning ♪ sean: and welcome to a very special edition of "hannity's america." -- of "hannity." hello, san diego. the site of our freedom concert and we have a big show in store. colonel oliver north will be here. former ms. california, carrie prejean, will be joined by the great one mark levine and our great american panel. and democrats are continuing their efforts to attack average americans who are speaking pout at town halls all across this country -- speak being out at town halls all across this country. they have been called angry mobs and dismissed as republican operatives. why are the democrats afraid of speech and can the strategy work? i'm joined by -- i call him the great one -- 12 weeks number one on "the new york times" best seller list, 17 weeks overall, liberty and tyranny, a conservative manifesto. great one, the great one. by the way, do you have a mob name? >> a mob name? i'm the shark. sean: you're the shark. he's the shark. are you all mobsters here? an angry mob. >> wait a minute. how many of you are insurance executives? raise your hand?
of clean energy. the department of the interior manages 20% of america. these lands that only include some of our treasured landscapes, but also some of the most productive energy areas. until recently, energy production of focus has been on conventional resources including oil, gas, and coal. insuring these resources is essential to our energy security, but we also have undeveloped potential on our public lands and under the leadership of president obama and secretary salazar, we are pursuing these opportunities. the bureau of land management has identified over 20 million acres of public land with energy potential and over 29 million acres with solar energy potential. there are also 140 million acres of public land in alaska with a geothermal resource potential as well as significant biomass potential. these public lands have the potential to produce a total of 2.9 megawatts of solar. 206 megawatts of wind. 39,000 megawatts of geothermal energy. there is also significant potential in our offshore waters. the department of energy, the national laboratory has identified more than 1000 giga
africa and the operations of hezbollah. we had experts here in the audience dealing with latin america. the question is, what are the iranians doing? what is hezbollah doing in that area? and in connection with the iranian involvement, and we do have our record of almost 30 years, it seems to me that we have to ponder the future with great concern particularly when we see the continuity of the ahmadinejad regime in iran today. so again, the bottom line of the question of threats and response depends on the perception of the threat and the coming of around at that i think we have to develop in order to reduce the risk of terrorism. so unfortunately from the academic point of view and a practical point of view, we would have to deal with this issue in the coming months as well as the coming years. i like to thank this opportunity -- take this opportunity to thank our panelist for this discussion. at this point, i would also like to recognize the interns who have worked with us this summer, who are finishing the work tomorrow. would you all please rise? where are the interns? this is the
, and in all who can pursue their dream in an america that is more equal and more just, including myself. the kennedy name is synonymous with the democratic party, and at times ted was the target of partisan campaign attacks. but in the united states senate i can think of no one who has engendered greater respect or affection from members on both sides of the aisle. his seriousness of purpose was perpetually matched by humility, warmth, and good cheer. he could passionately battle others and do so peerlessly on the senate floor for the causes that he held dear, and yet still maintain warm friendships across party lines. that is one reason he became not only one of the greatest senators of our time, but one of the most accomplished americans ever to serve our democracy. his extraordinary life on this earth has come to an end. the extraordinary good that he did lives on. for his family he was a guardian. for america he was the defender of a dream. i spoke earlier this morning to senator kennedy's beloved wife vicki who was to the end such a wonderful source of encouragement and strength. o
, about 50 pages. i read them, and at the time at rutgers, i'd teach a class called "murder in america." when i saw that he had been murdered, the intrigue of it was that his three doctors were three of the best physicians and the united states and they really messed up the investigation and the autopsy. knowing how hot forensics this, i thought this would be really interesting to apply this to an old murder case and then to probe the other areas of the case that were so surprising. >> did you decide right there on the spot to do that? >> i did. i told my wife that it hit me in the head. she said that that was a great idea and i should pursue that. >> how long did it take them to buy your book? >> i think a couple of months and then it took nearly a year to write it. >> how did you go about writing it? >> very carefully. i went down to williamsburg to the college of william and mary to the rockefeller library and i went to the state library of virginia in richmond and the richmond historical association. then, the rutgers library and a couple of other places. i did a lot of medical res
was the last surviving brother in a dynasty many have said is america's version of the royal family. he continued his decades-long push for mark even after he was too ill to travel back here to washington. more on that and a look back on his life throughout the morning here on fox 5 morning news. >> we just showed you the capitol flags are flying at half-staff today in honor of senator kennedy. tucker is in with a check of our weather. not a bad start to the day, pleasant. >> that is a good word for it. we'll have another great looking daat least as far as sunshine but we'll be on the hot side later this afternoon. there is not a whole lot to see. mostly a good news forecast as we go to view and take a look out tre. outt . you can see that the sunshine sull be bright here. sen i rwi in about a half hour and it should be a great looking day. there you go. clouds off the coast. e the loarcuds off to the north ancwestanuto towards cleveland and detroit. that is a cold front that will get in here tomorrow an give us another opportunity for some showers and thunderstorms. but today, it will
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
>>> good morning, america. this morning, a brand-new abc news poll show nows more than half of americans approve of president obama's health care plan. is the president about to go into gladiator mode to get it passed? >>> outrage at the heroes welcome the lockerbie bomber receives after his release. we asked, why did great britain do this? >>> storm surge. the latest on the path of the giant hurricane, bill. >>> stalled on the highway. some popular foreign cars are suddenly just shutting down in traffic. an exclusive "gma" investigation. and this morning, a recall. >>> and need more sleep? 70 million of us do. and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the test. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, here with david muir this morning. robin is away. chris is away this friday, august 21st, 2009. and there's a tsunami of outrage, pours over great britain this morning. >> all of the pictures pouring in. a hero's welcome for the bomber of the lockerbie pan am flight. al
and fear including this one from the supposed leader of the ohio militia. >> america, it's your wake-up call. >> i think that the president has in effect triggered fears among a fairly large number of white people in this country that they are somehow losing their country. >> reporter: officials tell my colleague pierre thomas at abc news that the president's daily threat matrix has yet to reflect a sharp increase inthreats. but white house officials privately admit deep concern and have told the secret service to keep security tight even if the president himself objects. bill and robin? >> all right, brian. so i bet there's going to be tight security and some very tough questions when president obama heads to montana later today holding the second of three town halls this week to sell and defend his health care reform plan. the president getting support from former president bill clinton, who came to his defense on thursday saying republicans are promoting fear in the health care fight. >>> senior white house correspondent jake tapper has more for us this morning. good morning, jake
estate market. had no government entity existed when private mortgage capital tried up and 2008, america's housing market would have come to a complete halt throwing out -- throwing our needs the commission into a deeper recession. we need only look at the current status of the if affairs in the commercial and mortgage market to see how different things might be today in the tradition -- if the traditional -- if the traditional regular mortgage market without fannie may and freddie mac. for those reasons realtors believe pure privatisation of the gse is unacceptable. rather, we support a secondary mortgage market model that includes some level of government participation, protect the taxpayers and ensures all creditworthy consumers have reasonable access to affordable mortgage capital. nar is currently conducting research to determine what model for the secondary mortgage market would best achieve these goals. we will share that information with you as soon as it is completed. for now, i would like to briefly outline a set of nine principles that nar's board of directors has adopted and
, but there is a debt to pay for students at west point. the top-ranked school in the whole forbes list of america's best colleges. the u.s. military academy topped all other elite schools including princeton, the california institute of technology, williams college, and way down there at number five, harvard. the school has a spectacularly beautiful campus on the banks of the hudson river. that was not one of the factors taken into account. forbes ranks schools based on the graduation rate, the success, the average debt at graduation. for many of the young men and women who attend the academy, the debt will be paid on the battlefields. a senior cadets are getting ready to become leaders inside those war zones. laura ingle has a look at west point with a look at their training. number one university in all of america. >> that is right. their training comes under the direction of the superintendent, the first commander of the u.s. invasion of afghanistan after 9/11. the new training involves simulated scenarios with arabic speaking actors all designed to put pressure on. for west point cadet jonath
and happiness belongs to america. that if i am a woman from it all i do not like choice. i enjoy being a muslim woman does not pursue happiness and these were also issues that i responded to when i was writing. >> host: in one of the reviews of the book, they made the argument that perhaps your mother ayyad delusion about herself, about the life she created, the illusion that you got sucked into it in many different ways and became a part of it is a metaphor for the illusion of iran, a country that has an image of itself and what it wishes to be and thinks it is deserving to be bought is constantly underperforming. is that what you had in mind? >> guest: i knew that in writing this book i was also responding to different feelings and emotions about iran about the concept what home is or was. but people who read the book always had insight that you necessarily did not have. i do think that we have an illusion of the past and if like my mother we become frozen and do not have a critical and dynamic conversation with the past we will never leave that past. we can change regimes every ten years and
that united america. after sputnik, we went to pick the moon. ronald reagan rally in the country to end communism. you can think of george bush's cry in 2001 that we would defeat -- lead a global war on terrorism and extremism. it is interesting, the last one, the war on terrorism seems to have lost some of that national feeling. when you do polling, you see people not as invested in the success of afghanistan and iraq and other places where we are fighting were secretly, such as the horn of africa. yet in our strategic interest, clearly fighting terrorism will remain the big issue. he what is the next big national issue? what can president obama defined as the national agenda? he tried very much to make health care that. in the last press conference he said it is intimately tied to your own personal future as an american. but we have not seen americans rally around that idea yet as a national cause. this is something president obama and his allies will try to do. he will try to cast the health care debate as important as going to the moon or defeating communism or terrorism you will se
in -- accountable. we must and against a subtle but growing tierney of our time. we must take america back. thank you very much. and [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please give a hand to a leader in the conservative movement. the author of "leave us alone", groverno grover norquist. >> after the 2008 election, our friends on the left have some advice for a spread they suggested we move to the left and stop talking about taxes and spending. it was very similar to the advice they give us after goldwater lost in 1964, after watergate in 1974 and in 1992. the other team always cheerfully advises not to be us. they said please stop talking about taxes. this reminds me of the scene late in the movie where the bad guy says to the heroine, put down the gun and we will talk. and the movie goes on for another 25 minutes. they give us this advice because they understand that would strengthen as the center-right movement is our opposition to big government, our support for liberty and desire to have lower taxes and regulation and more freedom. but our coalition holds together because everybody here and e
. >> that's why mom and dad aren't reminding america, hey, little baby, stimulus turns six today. >> angry next door neighbors. >> finally, we always like when athletes or people around sports get involves in politics. mike allen, who is the latest? >> the republicans are discovering that the nfl is a great place to recruit. they feel it helps them with their message of commitment, hard work, valus and so there's now a couple people who are trying to follow in the footsteps. >> did michael vick make an announcement last night? >> no politics in the michael vick interview. he said he found god, which we were happy about. >> he found god and he loves animals, please. who is your pr company? >> you don't like god or animals, mika? >> i just like reality. >> no, you know what, mika grew up in the mean northeast streets of harlem and she's a little more cynical. >> you're talking to a woman who has gutted a deer, okay? >> you know, by the way, they make you do that at madeira before you graduate. >> if you do it, where do you get to go? william. >> is it a problem that they interviewed me and w
the prospect of a woman of puerto rican heritage serving on the supreme court says a lot about america. says a lot about america. >> judge sotomayor has achieved academic and professional success, and i alaud her -- applaud her public service. but in the end her record creates too many conflicts with fundamental principles about the judiciary in which i deeply believe. i do not have -- it did not have to be this way. president obama could have taken a very positive step for our country by choosing a his tannic -- hispanic nominee whom all senators could support. president obama could have done so, and i regret he did not. i commend the ranking member of the judiciary committee senators leahy and sessions for conducting a fair and thorough confirmation hearing. judge sotomayor herself said the hearing was as gracious and fair as she could have asked for. i evaluate judicial nominees by focusing on qualifications which include not only legal experience, but more importantly judicial philosophy. judge sotomayor's approach to judging is more important to me than her resumÉ. i ask consent to put
an alternative energy project. the debate of sonia sotomayor will continue also, young america's foundation host its 31st annual student conference. congress does on healtbreak as healthcare heats up. in "the n.y. times close-" -- clinton secures two pardons from north korea -- that is in "the n.y. times." six months later it says here that obama returns with an approval rating of 56%. he is expected to tout his economic stimulus plan to kill us growth. he will announce manufacturing plants, but officials say there are successes to highlight locally, signaling that the times are getting better. it says that it is great that he can return to committees he cares so much about and see signs of success. i hope that he will go way encouraged, and he should. there are encouraging indicators that the economy is turning around, but the battle is far from over. long term there is reason to be optimistic, but still thousands of unemployed in this county begun until all are back to work, he does not think anyone can say it is all behind. on the phone now is a reporter for elkhart, indiana. what do you expe
that freedom and choice is what america has thrived on, and spread it around the world. going back to government control and everybody in taking all our money is not going to solve anything. host: caller, it is over to the sentiment by the cia director that it is time to move on to the business of protecting the country and not dwell on the past. caller: absolutely, absolutely. we are in a place where nobody has ever been before, and going back to the past is not going to help. host: thanks for calling. pablo on the line for democrats from brownsville, texas. caller: there are issues that have never even been discussed. host: like what? caller: there is a lot of secrecy and the cia and it goes back to a lot of people in my family who are now gone and not on this earth, but they worked for the defense department. there is something critical here. do we want the truth on everything? we want accountability. accountability to the people, our congress, and to our president. period. it is that simple. god bless you c-span for everything you do for public information and for freedom of sp
of the national urban league. [applause] i would be remiss-- i am told that america's mayor, mayor daley is in the audience here. i can't see up here mr. mayor bud if you are here thanks for the passport to come into town. there you are, mr. mayor, thank you very, very much. [applause] i understand that my colleague and a fellow a administration official, who he said jackson is here, the minister of the epa to is one of the best editions that the cabinet has made and i think, as she will tell you, i didn't make the new jersey governor capri-- cappi because i was her biggest booster to come and run the whole show so i am glad you are here. she really knows what she is doing. [applause] and a guide that, if i could do my job one tenth as well as he did his and does hismanal i would go down in the history books, but i don't have the talent he has, magic johnson. magic, just touch me, will you? just touch me. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, for 99 years, 99 years the urban league has been at this and after 99 years you have shaped the lives of millions of americans as well as american histo
america in hopes of helping hundreds o thousands who suffer from a debilitating condition. >> plus a young girl is attacked in her own home. now mclean neighborhood is on edge. we'll get the latest in the search for a suspect. >> doug hill in the weather center. no thunderstorms to talk about in the viewing area. we have lots of hot temperatures in our immediate weather future. we'll talk about that in great tale. that's coming here on a on a p >> police are warning residents in mclean to be on alert after the assault of a 14-year-old girl. this happened overnight in a unit of a peach tree of mclean apartments. investigators say the girl was sleeg on a couch when she awoke to a men standing over her. he apparently pinned her arms down. she screamed and he thread and she was not physically injured. >> the fairfax county board of supervisors voted to approve the expansion of the saundy academy. it will be in one campus adding 200 new students to the fairfax location. residents expressed concerns about increased traffic and the school's controversial history. the academy has faced allegation
the best man perched state in america. >> president obama also congratulated frigid and democrats for being the number one state to do business in. president obama's approval rating has continued to drop nationwide, something that bob mcdonnell will probablmention on saturday when he gives his address. >>> virginia voters appeared to be split on their approval of president obama. and new survey shows 42% of those polled approve of the president, 51% disapprove. at the margin of error is plus/minus 4.1%. >>> the senate passed a bill pumping an additional $2 billion and its cash for clunkers program, voting just before leaving on their august recess. the house approved additional funding last week. the president is expected to sign the bill which will allow the program to continue. >>> the other big vote, the historic confirmation of sonia sotomayor, the nation's first hispanic justice to serve on the supreme court. the votes were 68-31. while the confirmation was never in doubt, it is still one for the history books. iwith that, sonia sotomayor became the first hispanic and the third woman t
now to explain what that means is alan hartigan of america's town hall and cheryl galloway, the interim director for americans for prosperity. how do you feel about the town hall today? do you think it was successful? >> absolutely. it was a great event. we put this together in four weeks to have a crowd of 5,000 people in four weeks, is just phenomenal. over 20 organizes were represented. you helped out with that, i spoke to you earlier, you were part of organizing events as well as tea parties. how do you feel about what happened here today? >> i love to see the energy here. it's hot, august day, everybody was burning up. but there was a lot of enthusiasm and energy. people are glad to be able to tell their view, their side of the story. what they want to see washington do. i love seeing that people were ve responsive. i gave a speech to positive alternatives and people were enthusiastic about that as well. >> even on such a hot day, it was interesting to see how many people came out here. but from thevent these guys organizes here today, across the country, we've been he
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